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Kevin asked...

I have had a spell of lower back pain.

I have had a spell of lower back pain for about ten days where sitting down was making it a lot worse. I visited a NHS Walk in Centre and was advised it was likely a joint called the Sacroiliac Ligaments that was causing the pain. Since then the pain has more or less gone apart from ocasional stiffness but I have noticed a bit of pain in my right hip now (the back pain was initially the right hand side). When I say my right hip it seems to be a couple of cm above where I can feel my Hip bone and feels sharp/tingly but not very bad. Any ideas what this could be?

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The answer

Back pain is one of the most common forms of pain in the UK. Fortunately, as in your case, it usually settles within weeks with no serious consequences.

The sacroiliac joint is the joint at the base of your spine, where your sacrum – the lowest joint in the spine – is attached to the back of your pelvic girdle. This means it’s basically where the supporting bone structure of the top half of your body joins the bottom half. Not surprisingly, it comes under a lot of daily strain.

There are several possibilities for the pain in your hip. Firstly is ‘referred pain’ – the pain is coming from one part of your body (your spine) but is being felt in another part which is partly supplied by the same nerves (your hip). Hip pain is a very common finding in people who turn out to have pain originating in their back. The second possibility is that you’ve been walking differently to compensate for the pain in your sacroiliac joint and have put unaccustomed strain on the muscles surrounding your hip.

It should settle on its own within a few days (simple painkillers will help in the meantime) but if you get any new or worsening symptoms, you should see a doctor again.

Answered by Dr Sarah Jarvis.

 

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