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Sharon asked...

My mothers bp is 188/117 taken over a day it's change is minimal what does this mean?

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The Answer

Consistently high Blood Pressure readings is known as Hypertension and the risks of having Hypertension increases with age. However, other factors, such as obesity, smoking, too much salt in your diet, lack of exercise or too much caffeine or alcohol can also increase you risk of having a raised Blood pressure. Left untreated, hypertension can damage the kidneys, the heart or the brain, so it important to manage hypertension before this happens.

To help lower your mothers’ Blood Pressure, simple measures can be taken, if indicated, such as losing weight, reducing salt intake, increasing regular exercise, not smoking, eating a healthy balanced diet and cutting down on caffeine and/or alcohol. However, if the readings remain high, I would suggest taking her home monitor into the surgery to check the machine tallies with the machine used by the Practice Nurse or Doctor initially. If the readings are still the same, the Doctor may ask her to wear a 24 hour Blood Pressure monitor, or may decide to start her on medication to help lower her Blood Pressure which she will need to take daily. The Doctor will then ask her to monitor the effects of the medication until her blood pressure is within a normal range.

I do hope this helps to answer your question. Should you have any further queries, please call us on 0800 003004 and choose option 1.

Answered by Health at Hand nurses

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