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Claire asked...

Tags: eyes

My father is suffering with blepharitis and also glaucoma. He has been under the care of an eye specialist and tried over 20 different types of eye drops but they are not helping. Some of the treatments for blepharitis are not supposed to be used with glaucoma. Are there any alternative treatments that could be tried?

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The Answer

It is difficult to suggest any alternative treatment that could be tried for your father’s eye conditions without knowing what treatments he has already tried, but please find below a list of treatments for blepharitis and for glaucoma. Medicines for blepharitis include: 

Acetylcysteine, chloramphenicol, brolene, carmellose sodium, doxycycline hyclate, fusidic acid, lymecycline. Medicines for glaucoma include acetazolamide, brimonidine tartrate, timolol maleate, levobunolol hydrochloride, betaxolol hydrochloride, bimatoprost, brinzolamide, cosopt, dorzolamide hydrochloride, apraclonidine hydrochloride, latanoprost, pilocarpine nitrate, saflutan, travoprost. 

Topical corticosteroids combined with an antibiotic are effective short term treatment of blepharitis. They decrease inflammation and diminish symptoms more quickly. As you mentioned there are studies that show some preparations used in one of the eye conditions could exacerbate the other. 

Topical ophthalmic steroids used in blepharitis can induce glaucoma. Studies are present to show an increase in ocular pressure where these steroids are used. Therefore the physician needs to find a balance of a softer steroid to provide a safer opportunity to taper the anti-inflammatory effect with less likihood of inducing secondary glaucoma. 

We hope this answer has given you some leads on some alternative treatments that perhaps your father’s specialist hasn’t tried. 

Optometrist Karen Sparrow has some tips for good eye health.

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