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Roslyn asked...

Tags: dental , teeth

I have been told that my second premolar is likely to need coming out and I am devastated. I have been suffering from terrible depression as a result. I am currently waiting for another assessment at a dental hospital.

I have been told there is only the shell of the tooth left. (I had two bouts of toothache during pregnancy. I am 36 year old.) Do you think this could be restored in any way?

If not, I am seriously considering an implant from a private hospital. The rest of my teeth are fine. Am I likely to experience problems during/after treatment?

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The Answer

If your dentist doesn't think your tooth can be restored then you have 2 options. Have the tooth extracted or seek a second opinion. If you trust your dentist there should be no reason to seek a second opinion.

If there is only a shell of tooth present then there may not be enough tooth structure to restore it. If a dentist is willing/able to restore the tooth, this may not be a long term solution and ultimately may break or infect, leading to extraction.

It is important to consider the long term future of any treatment. If you do decide to extract the tooth and have an implant, then you may encounter pain, swelling or bruising but the implant surgeon will advise you on this. A full assessment of your condition would be required in order to provide specific advice on your case and, as such, the above only constitutes general information.

Answered by Dr Sej Patel.

 

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