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How can I quit taking Concor 5mg the right way?

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The Answer

What is Concor?

Concor contains bisoprolol, a beta-blocker that can have a profound effect on your heart and blood pressure. It may be dangerous to stop taking the drug, even if you reduce your dose gradually. For this reason, we think you need to discuss this matter your doctor.

How Concor works

Bisoprolol is the active ingredient Concor 5mg tablets. Bisoprolol is a beta blocker used to control certain heart conditions, including angina, and sometimes to manage high blood pressure.

It has specifically effects the heart, causing it to beat more slowly and with less force. This reduces the pressure at which the blood is pumped out of the heart, which reduces your blood pressure.

Concor doses

The common dose for managing these conditions is 10mg daily. Some people may need a lower dose of 5mg daily, or a higher dose.

The maximum daily dose of Concor is 20mg.

Concor tablets are available at a lower strength, namely Bisoprolol 2.5mg tablets. These are mainly used at the beginning of the treatment to allow a person to become accustomed to its effects, although some people may be stable at this lower dose.

The dose is often gradually increased to 5mg daily.

After this Concor may be increased further according to the person’s needs.

Quitting Concor

The dose can be reduced in increments or stopped but only if your doctor thinks that you need to stop taking it and monitors you while you quit. An alternative medication is often prescribed once the Bisoprolol is stopped. It depends on the condition being treated and your response and your needs. Never stop taking Concor unsupervised. It may be dangerous to do so even when reduced gradually.

Answered by our team of Health at Hand nurses.

Further reading

The low-down on high blood pressure – AXA PPP

How to really love your heart – AXA PPP

Know all your numbers – AXA PPP

Beta blockers – NHS factsheet

Heart centre – AXA PPP

My doctor prescribed me Concor

Useful resources

British Heart Foundation