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Andy asked...

I have spinal canal stenosis

Tags: diabetes

I have spinal canal stenosis. Today i have excruciating pain which began in the buttocks and shooting down the right leg.But now has become a severe stabbing pain in the right foot. I am also diabetic and awaiting a kidney transplant. I rang my surgery but a doctor couldn't even speak to me until Friday afternoon

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The answer

Andy, Thank you for contacting us here at Ask the Expert.

Spinal stenosis is a condition where there is a narrowing of the spinal canal and as a result this can lead to pain, numbness, pins and needle sensations and potentially loss of motor control.

The most common area of the spine to have stenosis is the lower back- lumbar region.

A narrowing of the spinal canal in this area often results in pains down the leg and sometimes into the foot- this is often referred to as sciatic nerve pain.

You mention that you are a diabetic and are awaiting a kidney transplant- diabetes can affect your kidney function, nerves and other organs if your blood sugars are not well maintained.

The pain in your foot may also be as a result of neuropathy (nerve pain) as a result of your diabetes or an indication of a possible infection.

You say that you are unable to speak to your GP presently but we would suggest that you try again to seek an appointment to discuss the possible causes as soon as possible so that appropriate care can be obtained.

If you are unable to access your GP you may wish to consult another GP in the practice that you attend.

If this is not possible then some alternative routes for seeking help could include:

Your Local Pharmacists –
They may be able to assist you with some advice regarding what analgesics you could use to make you feel more comfortable.

NHS 111 service-
This is a 24 hour service but is particularly helpful when GPs are not accessible who provide medical information and if need be can arrange an out of hour GP service.

Private GPs-
Although we cannot specifically recommend a private GP, at AXA-PPP Healthcare we do work with an organisation called Dr Care Anywhere. This is service which can be accessed via the internet where you can make an appointment with a GP for an over the phone or on line consultation but you would have to pay for these services. The website address for Dr Care Anywhere is: www.doctorcareanywhere.com

Diabetic Nurses-
Your diabetic nurse may be able to give you some coping mechanisms, analgesia and advice if the pain is being caused by neuropathy.

We are reluctant to suggest types of analgesics and methods you could use to relieve discomfort as you have not stated which medications you are taking and further details of your medical history and do not wish to complicate your well- being.

Andy, the best thing to do is to persevere and seek an appointment with a medical practitioner via the phone or direct contact as soon as possible.

Wishing you all the best.

Regards

Answered by the Health at Hand nurses  

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