Articles

Diabetes: June '14

Publish date: 05/06/2014

Tags: diabetes , fat , sugar

AXA PPP healthcare asked:

Our first question comes from Twitter:

Is it true that Glucose Fructose Syrup (HFCS) is a key contributor to the sharp rise in Diabetes in younger people?

Sally Knight & Caroline Exon commented:

Dear anon, HFCS is not a key contributor to diabetes. Diet does not contribute to type 1 diabetes, but the bodies inability to produce enough insulin when an individual consumes a high calorie diet  does contribute to type 2. . In regards to HFCS, please the article by the BBC

Anonymous299 asked:

My sister is pregnant and has been diagnosed with diabetes. Will this be with her for the rest of her life or will it go when she's had the baby?

Sally Knight & Caroline Exon commented:

Dear anon 299 - Gestational diabetes - For those who have gestational diabetes, blood glucose levels usually return to normal once the baby is born and any medication is usually stopped. Blood tests are taken before discharge to make sure this has happened with a follow up fasting blood test at the six week postnatal check. 

For those with diabetes, readjustment of medication or insulin is needed with eventual return of pre pregnancy treatment levels.

Those who’ve had gestational diabetes have an increased likelihood of developing gestational diabetes in future pregnancies and also type 2 diabetes.

AXA PPP healthcare asked:

A question from Facebook:

Whats the difference between type 1 and type 2?

Sally Knight & Caroline Exon commented:

Dear Facebook reader - In type 1 diabetes, the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas are destroyed by the immune system and therefore cannot produce insulin.

The exact cause of the immune system attacking these cells is not clearly understood.

Unlike type 2 diabetes which is usually slow to develop, type 1 comes on very quickly, often within days or weeks.

In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas either produces inadequate amounts of insulin, or the body is unable to use the insulin that is produced (insulin resistance).

AXA PPP healthcare asked:

Another question from Facebook:

Is getting diabetes later in life worse than getting it when you are young? 

Sally Knight & Caroline Exon commented:

Dear AXA PPP, type 1 diabetes generally affects the younger generation. although younger people are getting type 2 diabetes, this happens more commonly in the older generation. With type 1 diabetes you have to inject insulin whereas with type 2 it can be controlled by diet and oral medication. although sometimes you might require insulin injections if the condition progresses. 

Depending on your general health and any other medical conditions you may have, will determine how you cope with either type of diabetes. Diabetes can be a contributing factor to other medical conditions for example strokes, heart disease, high blood pressure and poor circulation

The older we become, the more likely we are of having other medical conditions which diabetes can exacerbate.

D_Mel_97 commented:

I was diagnosed diabetic in 1997 at the age of 33.  I had been told it was adult onset type 2 diabetes. For many years it was controlled with tablets mostly metformin, a few years ago I began liraglutide injections and then insulatard was added a couple years ago.  Does being insulin dependent make me a type 1 diabetic now... or am I still type 2 that needs insulin to keep my sugar levels under control?

Sally Knight & Caroline Exon commented:

Dear D Mel 97. It sounds as if your diabetes has progressed over the years. Generally when insulin injections are required the body does not produce enough insulin or your body is unable to use the insulin produced effectively (insulin resistant). However you still can be classed as type 2 diabetes. To confirm your exact diagnosis, it would be best to speak with your specialist or GP. 

AXA PPP healthcare asked:

One through from Twitter:

What are the most common symptoms of diabetes?

Sally Knight & Caroline Exon commented:

Dear twitter reader - these are the two most common types of diabetes

In type 1 diabetes, the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas are destroyed by the immune system and therefore cannot produce insulin.

The exact cause of the immune system attacking these cells is not clearly understood.

Unlike type 2 diabetes which is usually slow to develop, type 1 comes on very quickly, often within days or weeks.

In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas either produces inadequate amounts of insulin, or the body is unable to use the insulin that is produced (insulin resistance).

Sally Knight & Caroline Exon commented:

furthermore, the most common symptoms for  type 1  are

 

  • Increased and constant thirst – termed polydipsia
  • Producing excess urine which causes someone to pass urine more frequently – termed polyuria
  • Extreme fatigue
  • Blurred vision
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • and the most common symptoms for type 2 are
  • Fatigue
  • Producing excess urine which causes someone to pass urine more frequently – termed polyuria, particularly at night.
  • Increased hunger and/or feeling hungry not long after eating a meal.
  • Increased thirst.
  • Blurred vision.
  • Repeated thrush infections in the vagina (candidiasis)
  • Wounds that take a long time to heal.
  • Itching of the skin, especially around the genitals.

 

ShazzerP asked:

Hello Sally and Debbie

My mother-in-law is diabetic and manages her condition well with a careful diet. However, I'm curious as to why she is told not to eat cheese or use butter. Why is fat bad for diabetics?

Sally Knight & Caroline Exon commented:

Dear Shazzer, we should all be aiming for a well balanced diet whether or not we are diabetic. 

Foods high in fat;

Technically, your body doesn’t need any foods in this group, but eating them in moderation can be part a healthy, balanced diet. . It’s  worth remembering that fat is high in calories, so try to reduce the amount of oil you use in your cooking and choose lower-fat alternatives (of cheese and butter) wherever possible. Diabetes Uk offer low fat cooking tips in their healthy eating sections, which might be of interest and help to your mother-in-law. our website (AXA PPP Healthcare)  also has some useful information on diet and nutrition for diabetics on the healthy lifestyle section

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